Few people think about what will happen to their business after they die and therefore rarely put together a plan. Fewer may even think that a family or closely held business should be considered a part of their estate plan. However, for many small business owners, their financial interest in their business may be the largest asset that they have and represent most of the wealth that they will transfer at the time of their death. When transferring a family or closely held business, a well-funded life insurance policy can play a very large role in a smooth transition.

Providing For Your Children

There are a number of contingencies that a business owner has to consider when transferring their interest in their family or closely held business. While family businesses may be a truly family affair, with children working, operating and managing the business as well as the parents, it is a fact of life that not all of the children may be interested or suited to taking ownership of the business. In some cases, there might not be any children that wish to take over.

Parents believe that leaving their children the family home is a great boon but experience shows that beneficiaries are not happy with the bequest.

For many people in the United States chances are that their house is their most valuable asset. It makes sense then for most parents to leave their most valuable asset to their children. But this common inheritance is only a blessing for a small few of beneficiaries and a burden on most others.

Not A Quick Sell

Newly proposed IRS regulations meant to curb common estate and gift tax planning tactics is being met with a firestorm of resistance from financial advisers and estate planners across the country. The proposed regulations (REG-163113-02) place limitations on the use of current valuation discounts that reduce the overall value of assets in family-owned businesses, thus lowering a decedent’s estate and gift tax liability at the time of death. The IRS hope to achieve this end by disregarding restrictions that enabled taxpayers to use these discounts in the past.

Wealth Preservation In Closely Held Businesses

Currently, interests in closely held businesses are not taxed the same as other property interests due to their illiquid nature. Many tax and estate planners put a family’s assets in a closely held business to reduce their estate and gift tax liability. While this is a boon for many families seeking to preserve their wealth, others argue that what started out as a helpful tax break for legitimate family businesses is being abused and exploited by those who have no legitimate use of it.

It is common knowledge that in order for a New York will to be valid that there must be other people to witness you signing your will as well as putting down their own signatures on your will. Despite this knowledge though improper execution of the will is the most common reason that a will is found to be invalid.

Why Do I Need Witnesses At All?

Witnesses provide an important evidentiary function to the probate process. Witnesses to your signing can provide first-hand accounts of the execution of the will. If a will is ever contested, the witnesses can testify about the procedures that were followed when executing the will, the testamentary capacity of the testator as well as the mental capacity of the testator.

The Durable Power of Attorney is a powerful estate planning tool that everyone should have. Properly drafted, a Durable Power of Attorney allows for the right person to be able to manage your affairs when you are physically or mentally unable to do so. However, a Durable Power of Attorney goes into effect once executed and generally grants someone else great power to make decisions for you and to enter into agreements on your behalf. Many people may be uncomfortable granting these powers to someone else while they are still capable of managing their own affairs. Is it possible to delay the effects of a Durable Power of Attorney?

What Is A Power of Attorney?

A Power of Attorney is a legal document that is used to delegate legal authority to another. The person who signs a Power of Attorney is called the Principal. The Power of Attorney gives legal authority to another person called the Agent or Attorney-in-Fact to make financial and legal decisions for the Principal. The authority that the Principal grants the Agent can be as broad or narrow as the Principal wishes. It is entirely dependent on what powers the documents grants the agent.

Beneficiaries Often Treat An Inheritance As A Windfall And Spend It As Such

You spend your entire life working hard, accumulating wealth and you want to pass it onto your children, to provide for them and their families after you have passed. But will they appreciate your life’s earnings or will they blow through it without a second thought? Unfortunately, more likely than not any inheritance that you leave behind will most likely be spent much faster than it was earned, and the statistics are alarming.

“From shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations” the old saying goes and the research shows that the sentiment is true. One third of people who received an inheritance had negative savings within two years. Even if the wealth does last past the first generation to receive it, 70 percent of inheritances are completely gone by the end of the second generation.

An Often Overlooked Power in Durable Power of Attorney Documents

Your elderly mother lives and intends to continue residing in Florida. You live in New York. She becomes mentally incapacitated and you move her in with you to take good care of her. You are her agent as designated by her Durable Power of Attorney documents and you manage and handle all of her affairs like taking her to the doctor and getting her the attention she needs but you start to run into some problems when you attempt to enroll her in your state’s Medicare program and other entitlement programs. The power of attorney documents do not give you the power to establish her domicile. Even though your mother resides in New York now she still is domiciled in Florida and only qualifies for assistance in Florida.

How do you establish a new domicile and what is a domicile? Traditionally, establishing a new domicile is easy. Wherever you consider home, the place you intend to indefinitely stay, is your domicile. Proof of being domiciled in a certain state typically includes where your primary residence is, where you vote and where your family and children live. This is different from where your residence is. You can have multiple residences but only one domicile.

Nearly 55% of American adults die without a will or estate planning documents. This lack of planning can cause years of stress and heartache for your surviving family members and heirs. If you die without an estate plan in place, your family may be subject to:

  • Attorney expenses and court costs,
  • Wasted time and frustration, and

Art pieces and collectibles can often be difficult to price. After all, the best and easiest way to price an item is to see what other items like it have sold for. But in these cases, art and collections can be one of a kind and have no comparison. When this happens it can be a headache for a person planning their estate to account for the value of aesthetic beauty and rarity of their art. In this uncertainty though, there is room to maneuver to your advantage when it comes to planning out your estate.

Valuing Your Art

In the United States, if you are attempting to transfer a work of art valued over $50,000, the IRS goes through a process by which it independently evaluates the items. It is the IRS Art Advisory Panel who will have the final say when it comes to evaluating the value of your art, but this does not mean that they will not accept outside opinions. Traditionally art is valued by experts who work in the field, often those with very special niches, sometimes even down the individual artist. When an independent expert values your art, you can submit that assessment to the IRS for consideration.

Many people believe that estate planning is primarily a tool to minimize taxes by the state and ensure that your assets are passed on to the people you want them to go to. However, an important part of estate planning is ensuring that when you are incapacitated that your wishes will be respected and that you are taken care of when you cannot adequately express your wishes or provide for yourself. But how exactly is that decision made in New York? Who decides when you are incapacitated and when you will need someone else to make your decisions for you?

Your Living Will or Healthcare Directive Can Dictate The Terms of Your Incapacity

The best option for setting forth standards to decide when you are incapacitated is making sure that you are the one dictating the terms of your own incapacity. This can be accomplished through your living will, also known as a healthcare directive. Your living will traditionally acts to provide those making your healthcare decisions with your wishes as to how you would like to be treated in medical situations where you cannot give consent.

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