Most people are aware that April 15 is tax day. That simply means that you have to have your taxes filed and paid by that date and that the year that those taxes are due for are from January 1st to December 31st of the previous year. New York, however, takes a slightly different approach to estate tax liability. Estate tax liability rates are set from April 1st to March 31st. So, if you are administering an estate, wherein the deceased passed away on March 30, the estate tax liability will be different and lower than if they passed away on April 2 of the same year. As this blog discussed in the past, New York state amended its estate tax in 2014 so that it will be on par with the federal estate tax rate in 2019. Prior to 2014, New York had an estate tax exclusion of one million dollars. As of April 1, 2016 the estate tax exclusion is $4,187,500. As such the good news is that with the passage of the changes to the estate tax laws, more estates will not have to pay any estate tax at all. The bad news is that the majority of the estates that exceed that value will likely have to pay a higher tax rate than before and maybe even more than the federal tax rate.

Starting in 2019, New York’s estate tax rate exclusion will mirror the federal amounts. Since both are pegged to inflation, they will grow year to year. That is where the differences will end. Under the federal estate tax, only the amount above the federal tax exclusion is taxed. So, just to make the example easy, if the federal tax exclusion is $5,000,000 (it is not), an estate worth $6,000,000 would only be taxed by the federal government on $1,000,000. New York’s estate tax requires that if the estate is greater than 105% of the exclusion, the entire estate is taxed. So, with the same example immediately above, the entire estate (6,000,000) would be taxed. If the estate was say $5,249,999 (one dollar less than 105%) instead of 6,000,000, the entire amount would not be taxed, since the estate has to exceed 105%. If the estate was $5,250,001 (one dollar more than 105%), the entire estate would be taxed.

A second difference between New York estate tax and Federal estate tax is that New York does not allow the estate tax credit to carry from first spouse to pass away to the second. In other words there is no portability of tax credits as there is in federal tax law. That means that for those estates that could possibly breach the threshold of the estate tax value, it is imperative to engage in estate tax planning to insure that the spousal estate tax credit is sheltered.

Finally, there is no gift tax found under New York estate tax. Theoretically this would make estate tax planning much easier, except that one still have to plan for gift tax issues due to federal estate tax purposes. Moreover, any gift made within three years prior to death is included within the value of the estate for estate tax purposes.

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