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Back to the Basics: First vs. Third Party Special Needs Trusts in NY

Families throughout New York who have children with disabilities are frequently questioning how to best provide for their children’s needs–both now and in the future. It can be a complex issue, because relatives must balance their ability to provide help via their own private resources with available support through Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). SSI is designed to help those with certain disabilities with basic needs and is funded through general tax revenues, not Social Security taxes.

The government programs hinge on the specific income available to those with disabilities, and so relatives who provide support may unintentionally lead to disqualification of their loved one from Medicaid or lower SSI payments.

Special Needs Trusts in New York
Special Needs Trusts (SNTs) are critical in these situations, allowing parents, grandparents, or others to provide supplemental resources without affecting the individual’s access to important government programs.

SNTs are relatively straightforward in concept, but the specifics of setting them up and using them properly can prove complex. For example, there are two general types of SNTs: First party and third party.

Third party SNTs are usually more common for New York families in situations where a parent, grandparent, or guardian wishes to provide funds for the child. The trust then operates to provide support for the individual with disabilities throughout their life. At death, the remaining assets in the trust are paid out to relatives–the disabled individual’s own children (if there are any), siblings, or other close relatives.

Alternatively, first party SNTs use the disabled individual’s own funds to create the trust–not money provided by others. These are slightly more complicated in that they have a “payback” requirement. The disabled child is able to benefit from the trust funds without losing eligibility in government programs. However, upon the individual’s death, the funds remaining in the trust must be used to pay back the government for benefits received throughout their life.

Because first party SNFs require use of the disabled individual’s own funds and have a payback provision,they are not used as often as third party trusts. However, they may be appropriate in certain situations. Some common examples include: when the child with special needs receives a large inheritance or is granted sizeable funds from a lawsuit verdict or settlement.

Evaluate the Whole Picture
In most cases, the creation of a special needs trust is only done in combination with other planning that may include life insurance, unique inheritance planning, and similar work. Elder law estate planning includes many interconnected parts, and so it is crucial not to view any specific legal tool in isolation. An attorney can explain what combination of steps are needed to best protect you and your family.

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