Articles Posted in Asset Protection

Data shows that a troublingly large number of Americans do not have estate plans. Besides the challenge presented by not having an estate plan, many more Americans are failing to learn even the basic details about how estate plans function. In the hopes of clarifying some of the most dangerous myths about estate plans and how they operate.

# 1 – Estate Plans Aren’t Necessary If You Let Your Wishes Be Known

In reality, just because you would like your estate handled in a certain manner, there is no guarantee that your goals will be achieved. Even though your loved ones might know and remember your preference, they might find subtle ways to subvert them for their advantage. The best way to make sure that you achieve your goals is to work with an estate planning attorney who can make sure that you write legally recognized documents that uphold your wishes.

For many business owners, it’s a critical issue to make sure that business organizations including LLCs are properly structured. While many business owners have created revocable living trusts to articulate how their assets should be managed and to avoid probate, it’s a good idea that LLC interests are not put into the trust. This means that even if everything else with an estate plan is done correctly, a family would still likely need to undergo the probate process to both access and manage LLC interests. This, however, is not the best situation and there are more preferable options.

Placing an LLC interest into a trust is often a simple and affordable option. While it might be possible to simply file paperwork if an LLC involves a single member, it might be necessary to articulate such arrangements in an operating agreement. Many times, there are provisions in operating agreements that allow individuals to make these transfers. If no such provision exists however or there is not an operating agreement, the consent of the other LLC members is often required to perform such a transfer. 

The Advantages of Utilizing an LLC for Estate Planning

Regardless of your age, it’s critical to engage in estate planning to make sure you assert adequate choices over your financial and medical choices. Estate planning is also critical regardless of your economic status. While you will need to make estate planning decisions as you get older, even young people should also make your wishes known if anything happens. The Covid-19 pandemic has fortunately made many people appreciate the importance of being prepared for the unexpected regardless of age.

While estate planning is important regardless of how old a person is, a person’s estate planning needs to change as a person ages. This often means that younger people need fewer estate planning documents, but require more as they age. This article reviews some critical estate planning steps you should remember regardless of your age.

# 1 – Update Beneficiary Designations

Following his passing on January 23, 2021, Larry King’s widow remains locked in a dispute with the late celebrity’s son concerning the distribution of King’s assets. While estate battles are often challenging, this case is particularly complex for several reasons. One, a divorce was pending between Larry King and his widow. Additionally, King’s widow alleges that she recently discovered the late celebrity had a “secret” bank through which he gave over $266,000 to his son.

On February 10th, Larry King’s son filed an ex parte application to become the special administrator of his father’s estate. In support of his argument, King’s son submitted a holographic will that’s dated two months after King filed for divorce in 2019. King’s more formal will, however, names his widow as executor of his estate. King’s widow also argues that the late celebrity didn’t act like he wanted a divorce and that the couple had gone to counseling.

Much consideration has been given to Larry King’s holographic will. The one-page document is dated October 17, 2019, and states that Larry wants 100 percent of his funds to be divided equally among his five children and that the will should replace all previous writings. King’s widow argues that even if this document is found to be valid, it will change little. King’s widow also argues that during the last few years of his life, King was highly susceptible to outside influences, and at the time he executed the holographic will was of questionable mental capacity. As a result, King’s widow requests the court to reject Larry King’s son’s petition to be appointed special administrator and to deny admission of the holographic will. 

Assisted living facilities provide elderly individuals with a stepping stone between independent living and the more intensive care provided at nursing homes. Elderly individuals can receive assistance with things like cooking, cleaning, and hygiene at assisted living facilities while still maintaining personal independence. 

Deciding whether your loved one would benefit from an assisted living facility, however, is a complex process. As a result, this article reviews just some of the most critical factors that should be reviewed when deciding whether your loved one should be placed in an assisted living facility.

# 1 – Size

In the November 2020 case of Ochse v. Ochse, a Texas court heard a case that could potentially have a ripple effect on how trusts are interpreted. In this case, a mother established a trust that provided the trustee was authorized to make distributions to both the trustee’s son as well as the son’s spouse. At the time the trust was executed, the son was married to his first wife, but later divorced and married a second wife. The son’s children then initiated legal action against the son for breaching fiduciary duties as trustee and joined with the first wife who is also the mother as necessary parties. The first wife and son then filed competing summary judgment motions addressing whether the first or second wife was the son’s “spouse” as referenced in the trust. The trial court then held that the second wife was the correct beneficiary at the time of the suit. The first wife subsequently appealed.

What the Case Involved

The second wife and son argued that the use of the word, “spouse”, in trust documents did not mean the first spouse’s actual name. Instead, these parties argued that the term referred to the class of whoever was currently married to the son. The court of appeals, however, disagreed. The first wife argued that in the absence of contrary intent, a gift to a “spouse” of a married individual must be construed to mean the spouse at the time of the document’s execution instead of a future spouse. The first wife further argued that the terms “primary beneficiary’s spouse” as well as “son’s spouse” referred to the first wife because she was the son’s spouse at the time that the trust was executed. Both interpretations requested the court to view spouses as either statuses or class gifts. 

Executors as well as the personal representatives of estates can be held personally liable for either applying or distributing estate assets when there are unpaid estate taxes owed in case the Internal Revenue Service is not paid. When estate tax returns are not filed, the final amount of estate taxes due is not determined until either the statute of limitations expires or an audit occurs. Consequently, estate fiduciaries are left uncertain about whether or when an adjustment to estate taxes will occur if the Internal Revenue Service has accepted an estate tax return as filled. 

This type of response is unfair to both fiduciaries and beneficiaries because the most fiscally responsible fiduciaries can hold back on distributions until the amount taxed is more certain. To assist fiduciaries in assessing whether tax is due, an estate tax return is filed with the IRS. These returns are often issued following review by the Internal Revenue Service and a decision about not to audit or following the completion of post-audit procedures or litigation. 

The Role of Estate Tax Closing Letters

While many members of the Baby Boomer generation view Millennials as self-involved, the Millennial age group has been maturing. Some Millennials are even currently in their early 40’s. This means that many Millennials are reaching a point where they are having to engage in difficult conversations with their parents about estate planning. While many people falsely believe that estate planning is only the process of designating who should receive what assets as well as how debts are settled after a person passes away, estate planning also involves deciding who should make decisions about incapacity as well as other critical end of life issues. To better help you prepare to have a conversation with your parent, this article reviews some critical estate planning discussion tips that you should remember.

# 1 – What Documents You Need to Prepare

Wills are critical for resolving issues with a loved one’s estate after they pass away. There are also other types of critical paperwork that your parents should prepare while they are still alive. These documents include things like health care proxies, living wills, and powers of attorney. Creating these documents is critical, particularly if your loved one has a history of either Alzheimer’s or dementia. You should also know where your parent stores all of this paperwork. You should additionally ask your parent to create a list of passwords for accounts.

Trusts are either irrevocable or revocable. Many people prefer revocable trusts because they want to avoid placing their assets into a trust whose terms they can never change.

Simply put, irrevocable trusts are trusts that cannot be modified or terminated without the permission of the trust’s beneficiary. After passing assets into the trust, a grantor cannot change the terms and removes all rights of ownership to these assets.

Meanwhile, a revocable trust’s terms can be altered or canceled. During the life of the trust, income is distributed to the grantor, and only after the grantor’s death are assets passed on to the beneficiaries. 

Unfortunately, there’s no one size fits all estate plan. This couldn’t be truer during a year when a large number of uncertainties exist about the future. The Covid-19 pandemic has changed our lives in countless ways, which includes an increased concern about end of life issues. As a result, as we begin 2021, there are some helpful estate planning strategies that you might consider implementing.

# 1 – Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts

Grantor retained annuity trusts are financial instruments that are used as part of the estate planning process to both reduce taxes on large financial gifts to loved ones. In accordance with these trusts, a person transfers property to an irrevocable trust for a certain time in exchange for annual annuity payments. At the end of the trust term, a beneficiary receives the remaining assets. Because interest rates are currently low, there is an increased likelihood that the amount passing to the beneficiary will surpass the calculated amount of the gifts, which allows assets to pass to family members without being subject to gift taxes.

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