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Common Reasons for Contested Wills in New York

Many people know that having a will is necessary in order to properly ensure the deceased’s wishes are followed and desired transfers are carried out once they are gone. However, the importance of having the proper documentation in place does not end there. Careful estate planning is crucial to a will being upheld as valid in the event it is contested. If estate planning documents are not properly executed, the document is in danger of being challenged and may be ultimately revoked.

Common Challenges to a Will

An estate planning document such as a will may be contested for a number of different reasons. Perhaps heirs are not satisfied with their inheritance, or maybe family members fear their loved one made a bequest against their will. No matter the reason, the fact remains that wills do get challenged. Some of the more common challenges involve the following:

***A will that was previously revoked is presented as valid: If an executor is trying to pass an outdated will, a newer will that was created will likely invalidate it. Both destroying an old will and dating both documents accurately can help to avoid a situation such as this.

***The testator’s mental capacity at the time they executed the will is in question: The testator generally must be at least 18 years old to have capacity to create a will. Beyond that, in order to prove an adult lacked mental capacity to form a will, the challenger must prove the testator did not understand the consequences of making a will at the time of its execution. Certain requirements must be met to prove capacity, including understanding the extent and value of one’s property, who the person’s expected beneficiaries are, the disposition they are making and what their will means, and how these elements relate to distribute their property.

***The document was not properly executed according to legal requirements: This can include lacking sufficient or appropriate witnesses, or failing to contain provisions that are required to be part of the will by law. Although certain things, like having a will notarized, may not be a formal legal requirement, there are steps a testator can take to further authenticate the will as valid and assure a challenge to it will not be successful.

***There is evidence of fraud, forgery, coercion, or deception in drafting and executing the estate planning document: This can involve a scenario in which a third person influenced a vulnerable testator into leaving all of their property to them. Undue influence is usually a factor to be considered, which involves the testator lacking the free will to bargain because of the person influencing them.

***There is evidence of unauthorized changes or additions to the document: Usually, this involves things like handwriting over a will provision or providing a handwritten addition to a will. The will itself may provide for ways in which it can be changed properly.

Estate Planning Attorney
Whether you are considering challenging a will or are seeking help in defending a challenge to a will, an experienced estate planning attorney can assist .

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