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Special Needs Trusts for New York Families

Special needs trusts are helpful legal tools that allow parents and grandparents to leave behind assets to loved ones with special needs without damaging the beneficiary’s ability to receive SSI and Medicaid benefits. Our New York estate planning attorneys know that in the past the best strategy for these families was often to disinherit relatives with disabilities. Otherwise, assets might be given to the individual which would disqualify them from receive certain federal benefits. Of course this seems a perverse effect and unfair effect for those with disabilities. The special needs trust fixes that. The trust is a device that allows a resident with special needs to receive an inheritance and keep their benefits, all without the state actually receiving less than it likely would otherwise. The trust funds can be used to pay for a wide range of services for the individual like clothing, education, entertainment, household goods, and similar costs. Families have much to gain from taking advantage of this tool.

An article this weekend from Lake County News explored these trusts, distinguishing between the various types of special needs trusts. For example, testamentary trusts and stand-alone special needs trusts are compared. Testamentary trusts are those which are established at the death of the benefactor. Conversely, stand-alone trusts are created while the one passing on the assets is still alive.

One key difference between these trusts is that the stand-alone special needs trust can receive assets from different individuals. Some families may have a few parties that want to help provide for their loved one with special needs. The stand-alone trust, because it is not tied to any single parties’ will or trust, allows for these multiple benefactors. In addition, accessing the funds in the trust can be somewhat easier in a stand-alone special needs trust. That is because the funds are made available to the beneficiary in the stand-alone trust instantly upon the death of the benefactor. Conversely, in a testamentary trust, the assets must first need to be transferred into the trust following the benefactor’s passing.

As all estate planning attorneys will explain, an important consideration in each of these financial preparation efforts is determining if trust assets can be reached by creditors. Because the stand-alone trust usually involves assets being transferred into the trust while the benefactor is alive and solvent, those assets cannot be reached by creditors. They are essentially removed from the benefactor’s estate. Conversely, is the trust is not funded until the death of the individual, then the total assets are subject to creditor claims before they are transferred into the trust.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

New York Estate Plans Tailored for Those with Multiple Sclerosis

Family Disagreement Over Special Needs Trust Leads to Court Battle

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