Articles Tagged with bronx estate planning attorney

Estate planning is not something that should be taken lightly, and understanding the gravity that comes with your estate planning decisions is an important part of creating a comprehensive estate plan. However, one of the most common problems with estate plans is that while they may accurately reflect your wishes, they don’t always reflect what your family thinks those wishes should be. That can leave them vulnerable to attack in court, which can cause unintended consequences for your assets. Aside from utilizing the services of an experienced estate planning attorney, there are some ways to avoid common issues that can give rise to litigation of an estate plan.

Pay Attention to Laws of Intestate Succession

Intestate succession laws help determine how a person’s assets are to be divided when they die if that person has no Will or their Will is found to be invalid. While you are certainly free to distribute your estate as you see fit, understanding the laws of intestate succession can help you distribute your estate in a way that will discourage Will contests because beneficiaries that stand to benefit little from having a Will invalidated will often think twice about doing so.

According to the Pew Research Center, more Americans age 18-34 are living with their parents than in any other living situation. Over 32% of people in that age group live in their parents’ house which leads to an interesting estate planning dilemma for the parents.

While some adults who live with their parents are financially independent providing for their own daily living expenses and even paying rent, many living at home are in some way, shape or form financially dependent on their parents. This dependence can make estate planning even more important.

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2016 will undoubtedly go down as an infamous year of celebrity deaths and the unfortunate passing of celebrities continue. The world lost one of its funniest men this past August: Gene Wilder, star of Blazing Saddles, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Young Frankenstein and The Producers. He continued to be active later in his life, penning short stories and novellas while contributing to his charity work. Mr. Wilder passed at age 83 from complications due to Alzheimer’s disease.

Past Spouses Must Be Accounted For

While details of Mr. Wilder’s estate remain sparse at the moment, there are no rumblings or rumors of will contests or estate disputes despite the estimated value of Mr. Wilder’s $20,000,000 estate. This is impressive, especially considering that Mr. Wilder was married four times during his lifetime. Having previous divorces can bring numerous complications to estate planning as we have covered before. Considerations for past divorce decrees as well as keeping up to date estate planning documents must be made to prevent a legal mess after a person’s passing.

The Durable Power of Attorney is a powerful estate planning tool that everyone should have. Properly drafted, a Durable Power of Attorney allows for the right person to be able to manage your affairs when you are physically or mentally unable to do so. However, a Durable Power of Attorney goes into effect once executed and generally grants someone else great power to make decisions for you and to enter into agreements on your behalf. Many people may be uncomfortable granting these powers to someone else while they are still capable of managing their own affairs. Is it possible to delay the effects of a Durable Power of Attorney?

What Is A Power of Attorney?

A Power of Attorney is a legal document that is used to delegate legal authority to another. The person who signs a Power of Attorney is called the Principal. The Power of Attorney gives legal authority to another person called the Agent or Attorney-in-Fact to make financial and legal decisions for the Principal. The authority that the Principal grants the Agent can be as broad or narrow as the Principal wishes. It is entirely dependent on what powers the documents grants the agent.


Most people are aware that April 15 is tax day. That simply means that you have to have your taxes filed and paid by that date and that the year that those taxes are due for are from January 1st to December 31st of the previous year. New York, however, takes a slightly different approach to estate tax liability. Estate tax liability rates are set from April 1st to March 31st. So, if you are administering an estate, wherein the deceased passed away on March 30, the estate tax liability will be different and lower than if they passed away on April 2 of the same year. As this blog discussed in the past, New York state amended its estate tax in 2014 so that it will be on par with the federal estate tax rate in 2019. Prior to 2014, New York had an estate tax exclusion of one million dollars. As of April 1, 2016 the estate tax exclusion is $4,187,500. As such the good news is that with the passage of the changes to the estate tax laws, more estates will not have to pay any estate tax at all. The bad news is that the majority of the estates that exceed that value will likely have to pay a higher tax rate than before and maybe even more than the federal tax rate.

Starting in 2019, New York’s estate tax rate exclusion will mirror the federal amounts. Since both are pegged to inflation, they will grow year to year. That is where the differences will end. Under the federal estate tax, only the amount above the federal tax exclusion is taxed. So, just to make the example easy, if the federal tax exclusion is $5,000,000 (it is not), an estate worth $6,000,000 would only be taxed by the federal government on $1,000,000. New York’s estate tax requires that if the estate is greater than 105% of the exclusion, the entire estate is taxed. So, with the same example immediately above, the entire estate (6,000,000) would be taxed. If the estate was say $5,249,999 (one dollar less than 105%) instead of 6,000,000, the entire amount would not be taxed, since the estate has to exceed 105%. If the estate was $5,250,001 (one dollar more than 105%), the entire estate would be taxed.

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