Articles Tagged with Manhattan trust law

Healthcare coverage has been an unsure and confusing issue for both young and elderly citizens over the past decade, with the potential to only become more complicated as a new president takes office. While laws have been amended throughout President Obama’s term to now allow young adults to remain covered under their parents insurance until they are 26 years old, there are no hard rules regarding whether parents can qualify under their adult childrens’ health insurance plans.

Narrow Exceptions To Covering Parents

There are limited situations in which an adult child could get their elderly or ailing parent covered under their company’s insurance provider, however, they must meet a number of requirements. Parents can be covered under their child’s insurance plan if they can qualify as a dependent and meet specific criteria. Dependents traditionally have been considered those children under the age of 26 who do not maintain coverage, spouses or domestic partners, however, parents can qualify generally if they meet the IRS definition of dependent upon their adult child.

If you inherit an individual retirement account, or IRA, there are a few key rules you should be aware of in order to avoid potential legal, financial, and tax issues. Failure to do so could result in a smaller legacy left behind and a headache for your beneficiaries.

Never Commingle Inherited IRAs with Non-Inherited IRAs

Inherited IRAs are separate financial accounts than IRAs or retirement accounts you may own and contribute to for yourself. You cannot commingle the funds from your IRAs and inherited IRAs. If you inherit multiple accounts from the same person such as your father, you can combine those accounts into a single IRA. Assets inherited from different individuals, such as your mother and father, you cannot combine those accounts. It is also important to note that you cannot combine inherited accounts of different types, such as your father’s traditional IRA and his Roth IRA.

GOOD FIT FOR REAL ESTATE INVESTORS

If you are a real estate investor a land trust may be beneficial for you for several reasons. A land trust helps your business and serves as an estate planning tool. First, it helps you keep your real estate investments from becoming public knowledge. If you are the beneficiary of a land trust, your name is not listed as the landowner on the deed, instead the land trust trustee’s name along with certain identifying information are listed on the deed. If you are a celebrity or just reclusive in general this may suit you. Certainly the full extent of your worth and a list or accounting of your assets is potentially something that a seller may want to know when negotiating the sale of certain real estate.

In addition, a land trust helps to potentially shield you from liability connected with the land. For example, if you own a commercial building where a slip and fall occur, the victim of that slip and fall will seek to sue the owner of the building. More specifically, they will sue the trust, which will only be able to satisfy the judgment out of the assets contained in the trust. If you have only one real estate asset in the trust, liability is limited. There will be insurance which will satisfy the judgment, if the judgment is in excess of the insurance coverage, the victim likely can only go after asset. For these reasons alone, real estate investors should find land trusts as a good investment vehicle.

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