Articles Tagged with NYC trust law

Healthcare coverage has been an unsure and confusing issue for both young and elderly citizens over the past decade, with the potential to only become more complicated as a new president takes office. While laws have been amended throughout President Obama’s term to now allow young adults to remain covered under their parents insurance until they are 26 years old, there are no hard rules regarding whether parents can qualify under their adult childrens’ health insurance plans.

Narrow Exceptions To Covering Parents

There are limited situations in which an adult child could get their elderly or ailing parent covered under their company’s insurance provider, however, they must meet a number of requirements. Parents can be covered under their child’s insurance plan if they can qualify as a dependent and meet specific criteria. Dependents traditionally have been considered those children under the age of 26 who do not maintain coverage, spouses or domestic partners, however, parents can qualify generally if they meet the IRS definition of dependent upon their adult child.

2016 will not relent in claiming high profile celebrities. This week’s death was as tragic as it was needless. Anton Yelchin, aged only 28, an only child, was killed in his Hollywood home’s driveway when his Jeep rolled down a slope and pinned him between a brick wall and the car, possibly due to a known defect in the Jeep. Mr. Yelchin, most prominently known for his starring roles in Odd Thomas and Charlie Bartlett, will be deeply missed by all.

An Estate Unplanned

There is no information currently available about whether or not Mr. Yelchin had a will or an estate plan when he passed, but if he is like the majority of Americans, chances are that he did not even have a simple will. According to a survey by Rocket Lawyer, 51 percent of Americans age 55 to 64 do not have wills. Even worse, 62 percent of those ages 45 to 54 have never drafted a will. The lower the age, the higher the chance that that person does not have a will.

Who you name as a trustee is possibly the most important decision that a person who decides to create a trust will make. The trustee is responsible for distributing income and principal to the beneficiaries of the trust according to the terms of the trust. This typically involves extensive recordkeeping, managing investments and property and being in contact with beneficiaries and other professionals to help manage the assets. Traditionally many people have named trusted individuals such as friends or family to administer the trust, but these days many people turn to corporate trustees for managing trust assets. What are the benefits of a corporate trustee over a personal trustee?

Personal or Corporate

Typically, many settlors, the person who brings the trust into existence, will name themselves, a family member or a friend as the trustee. After all, being a trustee is a major responsibility and failure to administer a trust properly may result in liability being taken on by the trustee, which is why it makes sense to name someone that a settlor has a lot of trust and a strong relationship with.

CHARITABLE LEAD ANNUITY TRUST

There are many great estate planning strategies that allow a person to avoid or lower estate tax liability and give money to charity at the same time. With the large estate tax exemption and portability of estate tax exemptions only a small number of Americans will face the possibility of paying the federal estate tax. For many New Yorkers, however, the federal estate tax is a secondary consideration in light of the lack of right to transfer any unused estate tax exemption from for the first deceased spouse to the next. Instead of a double benefit, New Yorkers face a potential double hit of not only having a lower estate tax threshold, but being taxed on the entire estate amount, sans estate tax exemption. For couples that face this possibility and for those with larger estates, few match the simplicity of the charitable lead annuity trust, often abbreviated as a CLAT. It is also a good fit for those who seek to defer the payout of their trust payments to relatives quite some distance in the future.

The CLAT works quite simply by funding the trust with a certain amount, usually a large amount (since it is generally used by families or grantors looking to reduce their estate tax liability) that is scheduled to be paid out to a charity over of a certain length of time. Once the payout period for the charity is over, a certain sum, plus any additional monies earned (minus taxes and expenses of course) is paid to the remainderman beneficiary of the trust.

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